distrain

distrain
dis·train /di-'strān/ vb [Anglo-French destreindre, literally, to constrict, force, from Old French, from Late Latin distringere to hinder, punish, from Latin, to pull in different directions, distract, from dis - apart + stringere to draw tight]
vt
1: to force or compel to satisfy an obligation by means of a distress
2: to seize by distress compare enter
vi: to levy a distress
dis·train·able adj
dis·train·er /-'strā-nər/ or dis·train·or /di-'strā-nər, ˌdis-trā-'nōr/ n

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

distrain
I verb annex, appropriate, assume ownership, attach, bear away, carry away, carry off, compulsorily acquire, confiscate, deprive of, divest, garnish, hominis bona vendere, hurry off with, impound, impress, lay hold of, levy, levy a distress, make away with, possess oneself of, preempt, replevy, seize, sequester, sequestrate, take away, take into custody, take over, take possession of II index annex (arrogate), assume (seize), attach (seize), compel, condemn (seize), confiscate, deprive, divest, garnish, impound, levy, mulct (fine), seize (confiscate), sequester (seize property)

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


distrain
v. To seize personal property of an individual, typically a tenant, to compel the performance of an obligation, such as the payment of rent.
See also distress.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


distrain
To seize the property of an individual and retain it until an obligation is performed. The taking of the goods and chattels of a tenant by a landlord in order to satisfy an unpaid debt.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


distrain
To seize the property of an individual and retain it until an obligation is performed. The taking of the goods and chattels of a tenant by a landlord in order to satisfy an unpaid debt.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

Synonyms:
(for debt), , ,


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Distrain — Dis*train , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Distrained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Distraining}.] [OE. destreinen to force, OF. destreindre to press, oppress, force, fr. L. distringere, districtum, to draw asunder, hinder, molest, LL., to punish severely; di =… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • distrain — dis‧train [dɪˈstreɪn] verb [transitive] LAW to take goods from someone to be sold in order to pay rent that is owed: • Legislation has largely restricted the right to distrain goods found upon the premises but not belonging to the tenant.… …   Financial and business terms

  • Distrain — Dis*train , v. i. To levy a distress. [1913 Webster] Upon whom I can distrain for debt. Camden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • distrain — [di strān′] vt., vi. [ME distreinen < OFr destreindre < ML distringere, to force by seizure of goods < L, to pull asunder, detain < dis , apart + stringere, to draw tight, stretch: see STRICT] Law to seize and hold (property) as… …   English World dictionary

  • distrain — verb Etymology: Middle English distreynen, from Anglo French destreindre, from Medieval Latin distringere, from Latin, to draw apart, detain, from dis + stringere to bind tight more at strain Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to force or… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • distrain — distrainable, adj. distrainee, n. distrainment, n. distrainor, distrainer, n. /di strayn /, Law. v.t. 1. to constrain by seizing and holding goods, etc., in pledge for rent, damages, etc., or in order to …   Universalium

  • distrain — verb /dɪˈstɹeɪn/ To seize somebodys property in place of, or to force, payment of a debt. But when he heard her answeres loth, he knew / Some secret sorrow did her heart distraine [...]. Syn: distress …   Wiktionary

  • Distrain — To force a person to do something or act out an obligation under threat of being dispossessed. Cf. Distraint of knighthood; Disseisin, Distress; Distringas …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • distrain — v. a. 742, 752 B …   Oldest English Words

  • distrain — dis·train || dɪ streɪn v. foreclose on property, take property in payment for debts …   English contemporary dictionary

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