incorporeal hereditament

incorporeal hereditament
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Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


incorporeal hereditament
an intangible right over land in England and Wales. Examples are rights of way, rights to light and rights of pasture. See easements, profits.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • incorporeal hereditament — ➔ hereditament * * * incorporeal hereditament UK US noun [C] ► PROPERTY, LAW something which can be inherited (= left to someone by a person who has died) but does not physically exist: »The right to use air space over property is an incorporeal… …   Financial and business terms

  • Incorporeal hereditament — Incorporeal In cor*po re*al, a. [Pref. in not + corporeal: cf. L. incorporeus. Cf. {Incorporal}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not corporeal; not having a material body or form; not consisting of matter; immaterial. [1913 Webster] Thus incorporeal spirits… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • incorporeal hereditament — A right without the substance of a body but issuing out of a substance of real or personal property, such as rent issuing out of land, and capable of being inherited. 42 Am J1st Prop § 17 …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • hereditament — her‧e‧dit‧a‧ment [ˌherˈdɪtəmənt] noun [countable] LAW a piece of property that can be inheritEd: • Rates are not payable on any unoccupied hereditament for any period during which the owner was prohibited by law from occupying the property.… …   Financial and business terms

  • Incorporeal — In cor*po re*al, a. [Pref. in not + corporeal: cf. L. incorporeus. Cf. {Incorporal}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not corporeal; not having a material body or form; not consisting of matter; immaterial. [1913 Webster] Thus incorporeal spirits to smaller… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hereditament — Her e*dit a*ment, n. [LL. hereditamentum. See {Hereditable}.] (Law) Any species of property that may be inherited; lands, tenements, anything corporeal or incorporeal, real, personal, or mixed, that may descend to an heir. Blackstone. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hereditament — her·e·dit·a·ment /ˌher ə di tə mənt/ n [Medieval Latin hereditamentum, from Late Latin hereditare to inherit, from Latin hered heres heir]: inheritable property Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • incorporeal — in·cor·po·re·al /ˌin kȯr pōr ē əl/ adj: not tangible: having no material body or form incorporeal hereditaments an incorporeal right compare corporeal Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • Hereditament — That which could be inherited. As it suggests, corporeal hereditament was something physical, such as land or goods; incorporeal hereditament was intangible but real, e.g. a right to something; as *Bracton says, an incorporeal thing does not… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Hereditament — In law, a hereditament (from Lat. hereditare , to inherit, heres , heir) is any kind of property that can be inherited.Hereditaments are divided into corporeal and incorporeal. Corporeal hereditaments are such as affect the senses, and may be… …   Wikipedia

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