defalcate

defalcate
de·fal·cate /di-'fal-ˌkāt, -'fȯl-, dē-; 'de-fəl-ˌkāt/ vi -cat·ed, -cat·ing: to commit defalcation compare embezzle
de·fal·ca·tor /-ˌkā-tər/ n

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

defalcate
I verb appropriate to one's own use, cheat, defraud, divert funds, embezzle, falsify accounts, misapply funds, misappropriate money, misemploy funds, misuse entrusted monies, obtain money under false pretenses, peculate, purloin, rob, steal, swindle, take by fraud, thieve II index cheat, embezzle, loot, purloin

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


defalcate
v.
To embezzle funds that have been entrusted to the embezzler; to fail to pay over trust funds or other money held in a fiduciary capacity at the proper time.
n.
defalcation

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Defalcate — De*fal cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Defalcated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Defalcating}.] [LL. defalcatus, p. p. of defalcare to deduct, orig., to cut off with a sickle; L. de + falx, falcis, a sickle. See {Falchion}.] To cut off; to take away or deduct a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Defalcate — De*fal cate, v. i. To commit defalcation; to embezzle money held in trust. Some partner defalcating, or the like. Carlyle. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • defalcate — 1530s, to lop off, from M.L. defalcatus, pp. of defalcare (see DEFALCATION (Cf. defalcation)). Modern scientific use dates from 1808 …   Etymology dictionary

  • defalcate — [dē fal′kāt΄, dēfôl′kāt΄, di fal′kāt, difôl′kāt] vi. defalcated, defalcating [< ML defalcatus, pp. of defalcare, to cut off: see DE & FALCATE] to steal or misuse funds entrusted to one s care; embezzle defalcator n …   English World dictionary

  • defalcate — defalcation UK US /ˌdiːfælˈkeɪʃən/ noun [U] ► LAW the taking or illegal use of money by someone who has responsibility for it, such as a company or government official: »Our office represents title insurance agents and others accused of… …   Financial and business terms

  • defalcate — [15] Defalcate comes from medieval Latin dēfalcāre ‘cut off’, a compound verb formed from the prefix dē ‘off’ and falx ‘sickle’ (source of French faux ‘scythe’). At first it meant simply ‘deduct’ in English; the modern legal sense ‘embezzle’ did… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • defalcate — [15] Defalcate comes from medieval Latin dēfalcāre ‘cut off’, a compound verb formed from the prefix dē ‘off’ and falx ‘sickle’ (source of French faux ‘scythe’). At first it meant simply ‘deduct’ in English; the modern legal sense ‘embezzle’ did… …   Word origins

  • defalcate — verb ( cated; cating) Etymology: Medieval Latin defalcatus, past participle of defalcare, from Latin de + falc , falx sickle Date: 1541 transitive verb archaic deduct, curtail intransitive verb to engage in …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • defalcate — defalcator, n. /di fal kayt, fawl /, v.i., defalcated, defalcating. Law. to be guilty of defalcation. [1530 40; < ML defalcatus (ptp. of defalcare to cut off), equiv. to de DE + falcatus; see FALCATE] * * * …   Universalium

  • defalcate — verb To misappropriate funds; to embezzle. See Also: falcate …   Wiktionary

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